Mobile and manufactured homes present a particular difficulty for a home inspector.  With any home or property, our primary focus is on safety items.  However, manufactured and mobile homes are held to a federal, rather than a local standard, and some items that would not be acceptable in a site-built home are fine in a mobile home.  In addition, mobile homes have a different set of problems that we typically find.  As a result, a home inspector who is not familiar with manufactured and mobile homes should not inspect them.  In the following group of photos, you will see some of the common conditions that we have found over the years.  If you are thinking of purchasing a mobile home, be sure that your home inspector has experience with these unusual structures.
The interior floors are susceptible to moisture damage.  I find areas of leaking, primarily at corners and under windows.  These areas are particularly vulnerable if there is no awning at the exterior.  An awning can help to shield the window openings from direct rain.  The two primary methods of support under a home are metal jacks and concrete blocks, blocks being the most common.  The interesting thing in this photo is the pad on which the jack rests.  This is a recycled material made from soda bottles instead of the more common wood pads which tend to rot.  This, as you can see, is a concrete block support with wood spacers. The problem here is too many spacers were used between the block and the chassis, which makes it less stable.  There are many different types and manufacturers of lateral bracing.  Some are single supports that are attached to the underside of a girder at a single point.  The type in the photo is my favorite, as it is attached at several points and to both of the main support girders under the home.  The label on this water heater very clearly states that it should not be installed in a mobile home.  Yet, a majority of these structures that I inspect have one.  Why?  Well, the primary reason seems to be that they cost about $50.00 more than the tanks for site-built homes.  Aluminum wiring is common in mobile homes built during the Vietnam War years.  Copper was expensive and many manufacturers looking for ways to reduce costs turned to aluminum.  Unfortunately, this turned out to be a potential fire hazard.  If your home has aluminium wiring, it should be corrected.
Home inspections in Santa Rosa, Petaluma, Windsor, Healdsburg, Sebastopol, Sonoma, Cloverdale and most other communities in Sonoma County.
Home inspections in Santa Rosa, Petaluma, Windsor, Healdsburg, Sebastopol, Sonoma, Cloverdale and most other communities in Sonoma County.
Home inspections in Santa Rosa, Petaluma, Windsor, Healdsburg, Sebastopol, Sonoma, Cloverdale and most other communities in Sonoma County.
Click on these thumbnail images for a nifty little slide show and descriptions.
Phone:  (707) 528-7010
Email Gunnar
Email Scott

Office Hours
Monday - Friday 8:30 AM to 5:30 PM